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PSV Accessibility Regulations (DDA Regulations) - at a glance
#11
http://rustyoldrubbish.blogspot.co.uk/20...ustry.html

Is DDA killing the bus industry?
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#12
(15/08/2015, 05:16)citaro5284 Wrote: http://rustyoldrubbish.blogspot.co.uk/20...ustry.html

Is DDA killing the bus industry?

I'm going to agree in some way....


Some designs for buses has got worse... StreetDecker is one of those...

Companies can't afford to buy DDA buses - massive batches....

Although

They help people with disabilities 
The elderly 

AND

People with pushchairs think they the right to be first in line for a space to

...as my nana says: I remember putting the pushchairs down in 3 foot snow in a snow storm and having 10 bags of shopping... its not bloody hard, people these days are lazy.
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#13
The Disability Discrimination Act was superseded 5 years ago for a start. Its the Equality Act these days...

And no. The PSVAR is no more than a list of reasonable adjustments, to make buses available for everyone. That can only be a good thing. On the same token, an employer would be required to make similar adjustments, if they had disabled employees.
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#14
(15/08/2015, 08:55)Michael Wrote: People with pushchairs think they the right to be first in line for a space to

...as my nana says: I remember putting the pushchairs down in 3 foot snow in a snow storm and having 10 bags of shopping... its not bloody hard, people these days are lazy.

But just because people were expected to fold up pushchairs and struggle to board buses with kids and shopping in tow 10, 20 or 30 years ago doesn't mean the bus industry should live in the past and expect everyone to do the same without being proactive and providing progressive solutions to problems arising from poor accessibility. 

As many families with babies/toddlers tend to choose the car over the bus, I can't help but think that this sort of attitude is targeted towards a specific demographic who are forced to use public transport.
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#15
(15/08/2015, 08:55)Michael Wrote: I'm going to agree in some way....


Some designs for buses has got worse... StreetDecker is one of those...

Companies can't afford to buy DDA buses - massive batches....

Although

They help people with disabilities 
The elderly 

AND

People with pushchairs think they the right to be first in line for a space to

...as my nana says: I remember putting the pushchairs down in 3 foot snow in a snow storm and having 10 bags of shopping... its not bloody hard, people these days are lazy.

And many mothers never left the house. I bought a buggy for big'un that I could fold one handed but still couldn't handle it plus a very wriggly toddler and it was useless in Durham. Forget carrying any actual shopping. 

I could get the Peterlee as the 21 at the time went on to Sunderland and was required to have more modern buses, but it was rarely worth the bother.
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#16
I wholly agree that all buses should be low-floor. What I don't agree with is how low-floor vehicles which are perfectly accessible aren't DDA-compliant for the most minor things which barely inconvenience disabled passengers.

Modifying these vehicles (or replacing them with vehicles which are DDA-compliant) would be a huge cost to a small business. What's better - a non-DDA compliant low-floor single decker turning up, or no bus at all?
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#17
(15/08/2015, 11:29)Dan Wrote: I wholly agree that all buses should be low-floor. What I don't agree with is how low-floor vehicles which are perfectly accessible aren't DDA-compliant for the most minor things which barely inconvenience disabled passengers.

Modifying these vehicles (or replacing them with vehicles which are DDA-compliant) would be a huge cost to a small business. What's better - a non-DDA compliant low-floor single decker turning up, or no bus at all?

Minor things to you and I, may be a major thing to persons affected by it. I'd reckon there's proper reason and research behind everything included in the Equality Act and the PSVAR. Looking at the PSVAR specifically, a lot of operators are only doing the minimum required, rather than applying best practice. Though you'd expect modern orders to only be supplied as best practice.

I don't buy the non-compliant bus vs. no bus at all argument. If the bus isn't compliant, then for those affected by the element of non-compliance, the bus hasn't turned up for them.
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#18
(15/08/2015, 11:45)aureolin Wrote: Minor things to you and I, may be a major thing to persons affected by it. I'd reckon there's proper reason and research behind everything included in the Equality Act and the PSVAR. Looking at the PSVAR specifically, a lot of operators are only doing the minimum required, rather than applying best practice. Though you'd expect modern orders to only be supplied as best practice.

I don't buy the non-compliant bus vs. no bus at all argument. If the bus isn't compliant, then for those affected by the element of non-compliance, the bus hasn't turned up for them.

Hardly anything has changed on Go North East's now DDA-compliant Volvo B10BLEs - sorry, I cannot see the removal of one seat and a few further minor modifications being of great assistance to disabled passengers.

You questioned yourself if the Merits were DDA-compliant. These have a more awkward seating layout than any Volvo B10BLE I've been on, yet look which one isn't DDA-compliant...

Stand by what I said before... If a disabled passenger is not affected by something which makes a bus non-DDA compliant - what's better, that bus, or none at all (on what could potentially be a lifeline service to some passengers, given that a large number of independent operators do operate lifeline services).

Again, I really do support all buses being low-floor, but DDA compliance really isn't limited to this.
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#19
Also, I can't understand why the Lolynes aren't DDA compliant. Compared to the Presidents, the Lolynes are much more accessible and you hear a lot of people complaining when the Presidents are on the 1 and 17 due to the lack of wheelchair room (1 small space compared to 2 spaces on the Lolynes) and also lack of seats downstairs.
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#20
(15/08/2015, 11:51)Dan Wrote: Hardly anything has changed on Go North East's now DDA-compliant Volvo B10BLEs - sorry, I cannot see the removal of one seat and a few further minor modifications being of great assistance to disabled passengers.

Stand by what I said before... If a disabled passenger is not affected by something which makes a bus non-DDA compliant - what's better, that bus, or none at all (on what could potentially be a lifeline service to some passengers, given that a large number of independent operators do operate lifeline services).

There'll never be some generic catch-all for the typical disabled passenger though. What may affect one person with disabilities, may not affect another with disabilities. Of course, those not affected by it would always say 'that bus', but the Equality Act is all about inclusion - not exclusion. 

I can't personally see why the removal of a seat makes a difference either, but I find that things aren't always as black and white as they seem. Who am I to question a set of regulations, that someone a lot more qualified than I am, has come up with? It of course doesn't remove my curiosity. 

Village shops can also provide a lifeline service to locals. Having a step entrance and doorway not wide enough for a wheelchair may benefit the majority, but it'd exclude wheelchair users. It also amounts to indirect discrimination.
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