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New technology in buses
#61
http://www.alphr.com/technology/1007098/...one-charge

Electric bus travels over 1000 miles on one charge.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
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#62
https://m.facebook.com/simplyGNE#!/story...5880875709

I've been thinking about this for a while now.
We have apps which show buses on the map and we have information like we see in the link above.
Yet we don't have anything (that I'm aware of) which feeds directly to a website or even a landing page (bear with me on the landing page info).

Using TfL or VTEC as examples, you can find out within seconds about issues or delays on the website, yet with bus operators, we have to fiddle or hunt around.
This applies for people already using a bus and because of the hub n spoke model, are possibly going to get a connecting service at some point.

Why don't operators ensure this information is easily available?
The information in the link above, could be shared as a push message, shared on a WiFi landing page or even put on the website.

I appreciate that a set of bus routes are managed differently to a set of trains on a specific line. However as seen in the example above, all buses in the Dalton Park, Murton and Seaham areas are affected.
The message put out can be as simple as that.

When the upcoming Christmas rush starts, details could be shared quite easily about the inevitable snarl ups at Team Valley or Metrocentre.

Service levels could be tiered in a 'RAG' report.

If I am travelling, I don't want to be searching various places to find out if my journey is delayed. Is it on the app? Is the app even working? Is it on twitter or fb? Do I need to chase up this information on twitter or fb? If I go to the stop, will the information be shared at the few stops with the technology to do so?

A consistent message, which is given to me at source is what I want.
I get that information when I am using the tube and I get that information when using VTEC.
I don't always get it when using the bus.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
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#63
Interesting points, and I agree with what you've said.

I've seen a demonstration of an app which allows operators to make use of push notifications. It allows users to "opt in" if they wish to receive push notifications for service updates. The user selects each service they would like to receive service updates for, and then every time a controller has a service update to publish regarding a specific service, they would tag the update with each service it is relevant to.

Clearly this is relying on a company's passengers having a smartphone with the app downloaded and I'm not suggesting it will appear in the North East any time soon, but for me, this has to be the way forward!

The only issue I think it could cause is potentially becoming overkill and giving a bit too much visibility, possibly becoming a little bit annoying to users.
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#64
Bus GPS location system being used to deliver targeted advertising.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/38fcc...f864fcf112
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#65
(27/10/2017, 17:53)Andreos1 Wrote: https://m.facebook.com/simplyGNE#!/story...5880875709

I've been thinking about this for a while now.
We have apps which show buses on the map and we have information like we see in the link above.
Yet we don't have anything (that I'm aware of) which feeds directly to a website or even a landing page (bear with me on the landing page info).


Using TfL or VTEC as examples, you can find out within seconds about issues or delays on the website, yet with bus operators, we have to fiddle or hunt around.
This applies for people already using a bus and because of the hub n spoke model, are possibly going to get a connecting service at some point.

Why don't operators ensure this information is easily available?
The information in the link above, could be shared as a push message, shared on a WiFi landing page or even put on the website.

I appreciate that a set of bus routes are managed differently to a set of trains on a specific line. However as seen in the example above, all buses in the Dalton Park, Murton and Seaham areas are affected.
The message put out can be as simple as that.

When the upcoming Christmas rush starts, details could be shared quite easily about the inevitable snarl ups at Team Valley or Metrocentre.

http://app.arrivabus.co.uk is a website that Arriva has to show you the buses in real time. I use the website a lot because I can’t get the app on my phone.
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#66
(27/10/2017, 18:05)Dan Wrote: Interesting points, and I agree with what you've said.

I've seen a demonstration of an app which allows operators to make use of push notifications. It allows users to "opt in" if they wish to receive push notifications for service updates. The user selects each service they would like to receive service updates for, and then every time a controller has a service update to publish regarding a specific service, they would tag the update with each service it is relevant to.

Clearly this is relying on a company's passengers having a smartphone with the app downloaded and I'm not suggesting it will appear in the North East any time soon, but for me, this has to be the way forward!

The only issue I think it could cause is potentially becoming overkill and giving a bit too much visibility, possibly becoming a little bit annoying to users.

Sticking with the rail example, Hull Trains and the one VTEC set have the screens which have scrolling news reports and TfL updates.
Again, something which can be taken up by bus operators and adapted to suit their passengers needs.

(28/10/2017, 12:56)DavidSBrough Wrote: http://app.arrivabus.co.uk is a website that Arriva has to show you the buses in real time. I use the website a lot because I can’t get the app on my phone.
I must admit that my personal phone doesn't let me use the apps either. My stubbornness and total lack of interest in compromising my phone choice to suit, is one reason why I dont use the apps.

Another, is their reputation for reliability and accuracy.
I gave up with the GNE app on my work phone after one too many glitches, areas of the app being removed 'temporarily', errors and re-boots and obviously there are comments about the accuracy of the ANE live tracking on the forum.

Being honest, I forgot you could follow the tracking via the website.

I suppose it adds weight to my comments about relying on various different sources, just to find out where the bus is.
Unless you fiddle around, click on a specific bus and use some intuition, the live tracking doesn't really tell you about any specific delays either.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
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#67
(29/10/2017, 21:34)Andreos1 Wrote: Sticking with the rail example, Hull Trains and the one VTEC set have the screens which have scrolling news reports and TfL updates.
Again, something which can be taken up by bus operators and adapted to suit their passengers needs.

I must admit that my personal phone doesn't let me use the apps either. My stubbornness and total lack of interest in compromising my phone choice to suit, is one reason why I dont use the apps.

Another, is their reputation for reliability and accuracy.
I gave up with the GNE app on my work phone after one too many glitches, areas of the app being removed 'temporarily', errors and re-boots and obviously there are comments about the accuracy of the ANE live tracking on the forum.

Being honest, I forgot you could follow the tracking via the website.

I suppose it adds weight to my comments about relying on various different sources, just to find out where the bus is.
Unless you fiddle around, click on a specific bus and use some intuition, the live tracking doesn't really tell you about any specific delays either.

All too often, it's just plain wrong, too. Like that time we waited over half an hour for a 6. The app showed 2 of them passing us, in that time and the woman at the bus stop who ignored my insistence that arriva customer services would be even more in the dark than us and phoned them up just got the message that buses were running as usual with small delays.
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